Sally Helgesen, Marshall Goldsmith

Trying to master every detail of your job in order to become an expert is a great strategy for keeping the job you have. But if your goal is to move to a higher level, your expertise is probably not going to get you there. In fact, such mastery often serves to trap you in your current role. […] Of course, we’re not advocating sloppy … [ Read more ]

John K. Coyle

All of us — individuals, teams, and organizations — have weaknesses. These are not skill gaps; those can be corrected with learning. Weaknesses are inherent deficiencies of talent or capability that do not change even after aggressive efforts to improve them. Pride and our ingrained work ethic may cause us to deny our weaknesses, but acceptance is the first step toward designing for strength.

[…] … [ Read more ]

Scott Keller, Mary Meaney

[Books often] say that you have a limited period to achieve full productivity as a leader and that if you don’t make it in time, you are doomed. The evidence doesn’t support these claims: 92 percent of external and 72 percent of internal hires take far more than 90 days to reach full productivity.14 Sixty-two percent of external and 25 percent of internal hires admit … [ Read more ]

Scott Keller, Mary Meaney

Every leader should mount a transition in two equally important stages: first take stock and then take action by asking questions about five basic dimensions of leadership—the strategy and operation of the business or function, the corporate culture, the team, the leader herself or himself, and other stakeholders that need to be managed. Beware of generic answers because every leader’s starting point is different. For … [ Read more ]

Scott Keller, Mary Meaney

Organizations most often try to help newly appointed leaders by supplying them with mentors or informal “buddy” networks. Yet only 47 percent of external hires and 29 percent of internal ones find these helpful. Standard orientation programs are the second most common approach, but only 19 percent of externally and 11 percent of internally recruited executives consider them effective. Some methods—for instance, tailored executive coaching … [ Read more ]

Frank Herbert

Any one response to the universe, however powerful, becomes inappropriate with time and change. Those who become utterly dependent on one means of mastery will find themselves unable to cope with the future.

Todd Davis

What I see time and time again at work is that we confuse activity with results. We get to the end of the day or the end of the week or the end of our life, and we’ve been very busy, we’ve been very exhausted, and we’ve been doing a lot of things. But have we been doing those things that really matter or make … [ Read more ]

How Women Can Succeed by Rethinking Old Habits

Everyone has self-limiting behaviors; this is simply part of being human. But our combined six decades of professional experience coaching and working with women in virtually every sector have taught us that even women at the highest levels can undermine themselves with specific self-sabotaging behaviors that are different from those that most frequently undermine men.

Expertise, connections, and personal authority are all non-positional kinds of power … [ Read more ]

5 Ways to Differentiate Your LinkedIn Profile

William Arruda offers tips for making your LinkedIn profile stand out and attract more employers.

Networking is Overrated

It’s true that networking can help you accomplish great things. But this obscures the opposite truth: Accomplishing great things helps you develop a network. If you make great connections, they might advance your career. If you do great work, those connections will be easier to make. Let your insights and your outputs — not your business cards — do the talking.

When You Start a New Job, Pay Attention to These 5 Aspects of Company Culture

When you join an organization, you have a short window of time to adapt to its culture. It’s the old 90-day rule. And we know too many talented individuals who have stumbled in their new company because they failed to read the cultural tea leaves. This happens because most organizations don’t explain the cultural rules to newcomers, and new hires are so focused on the … [ Read more ]

Most Leaders Know Their Strengths — but Are Oblivious to Their Weaknesses

What we see when we administer 360-degree feedback surveys on behalf of leaders is that the executives with really low scores in one or more areas are often completely unaware of their fatal flaws. They are shocked to find themselves scoring so low — even though approximately 30% of all the leaders we’ve studied have at least one fatal flaw.

Here’s Why Founders Should Care about Happiness

Scott Crabtree spent 24 years climbing the ladder in the gaming and software industries, eventually leading his own engineering team at Intel. And after observing life at companies big and small, he recognized one commonality: The happiest people are the most productive. The difference was so striking to him that he retired and rebooted his career, founding Happy Brain Science to surface and share the … [ Read more ]

Ruth Simmons

[Students] should never assume that they can predict what experiences will teach them the most about what they value, or about what their life should be. You have to be open and alert at every turn to the possibility that you’re about to learn the most important lesson of your life.

Types of Intelligence and How to Find The One You Are Best In

For most people, being intelligent is perceived as having a lot of useful (and sometimes non-useful) knowledge and skills, and being able to apply such knowledge and skills.

That’s not wrong, mind you. In fact, it is one of the several accurate definitions of intelligence circulating today. Where it goes wrong in actual application is how people believe that being knowledgeable and skilled at general and … [ Read more ]

Scott Crabtree

There’s a common assumption that you will be happy when you are successful. But the reverse is actually true, and not just anecdotally. Hard neurological science supports the idea that happy people have more capacity to succeed. And beyond that, that happiness is not a genetic mandate, or a product of circumstance. It’s a choice.

TransparentCareer

The first version of TransparentCareer was built as a class project for a Ruby on Rails programming class in 2016. Mitch, a student at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, wanted better data on what different companies paid MBAs, how happy they were, and ultimately how different choices would impact his career long-term. So he set out to build a better compensation and … [ Read more ]

How to Become Insanely Well-Connected

Chris Fralic is a successful VC himself, responsible for First Round’s investments in Warby Parker, Roblox, HotelTonight and Adaptly among others. When asked what’s made his career possible, he’ll tell you outright it’s the relationships — built deliberately over many years. This might sound like a common response, but among his peers, he’s acknowledged to be a world-class super-connector with rarefied expertise.

In this piece, … [ Read more ]

How to Manage Peers When You Get Promoted

Managing your peers can be a tough task, as the jump from working together to working for the other person can create friction and wariness. In this guide, we’ll give you tips on how to make the transition smoother and to manage your peers when the promotion lands on your desk.