Winning in Asia: Strategies for Competing in the New Millennium

The competitive landscape in Asia is undergoing a sea change. Companies are finally breaking the bonds imposed by the 1997 financial crisis. The engine of growth is shifting from exports to Asian market demand. China’s rapid development is redrawing the Asian playing field. National fiefdoms are succumbing to cross-border competition. Together, these forces are signaling the emergence of a fundamentally new competitive game-and there will … [ Read more ]

Inventing Japan, 1853-1964 (A Modern Library Chronicles Series)

Cool, informed historical primer from journalist-novelist Buruma (The Missionary and the Libertine, 2000, etc.), tracing Japan from its opening to the West in 1853 through its transformation into a militaristic state to its reemergence as a peaceful, pacifistic host of the 1964 Olympics. From start to finish, this concise narrative unfolds in dense ironies. In the 19th century, Commodore Matthew Perry’s interpreter observed that the … [ Read more ]

Thunder from the East: Portrait of a Rising Asia

These Pulitzer Prize-winning journalists from the New York Times present unusual perspective on the lives of ordinary people in Asian countries. This is an outstanding overview of the state of the region for executives wanting to understand how Asia will evolve in the 21st century.

The Knowledge-Creating Company: How Japanese Companies Create the Dynamics of Innovation

This book addresses the generation-old question of why the Japanese are so successful in business. The authors, professors of management at Hitosubashi University, contend that Japanese firms are successful because they are innovative, that is, because they create new knowledge and use it to produce successful products and technologies. They identify two types of organizational knowledge: explicit knowledge, contained in procedures and manuals, and tacit … [ Read more ]

The Mind Of The Strategist: The Art of Japanese Business

Originally published in 1982, this classic guide to the inner workings of the strategic thinking process offers provocative insights into the ways that the Japanese think strategically and focuses on helping western business people free up their creative power to improve the odds of creating winning strategic concepts.

Can Japan Compete?

Not long ago, Japan was considered a competitive powerhouse with exemplary business practices that were admired and often copied, particularly in the West. What went wrong? In a new book, HBS professor Michael Porter and two coauthors take a closer look.

Editor’s Note: read an interview with Porter about this book at
http://hbswk.hbs.edu/item.jhtml?id=1894&t=leadership