Liz Fosslien

I love Adam Grant’s tactic for interviewees to learn about an organization’s culture: A job candidate can ask, “Tell me a story about something that would only happen here.” It’s a neat trick for candidates, but when you’re a manager, and by consequence an arbiter of the company’s culture, you should be asking yourself that, too. What’s that story for your company? Does it involve … [ Read more ]

Liz Fosslien

The best managers ask questions and invite specific, meaningful feedback. Ask your direct reports, “What is one thing I can do to improve?” or “ Is there a roadblock I can remove for you?,” Finally, if you ask for feedback, follow through on it. If your direct reports give you feedback and then get radio silence in return, they’re never going to give you feedback … [ Read more ]

Liz Fosslien

Make an observation, not a generalization. A colleague interrupts you at a meeting. You could say, “Hey, you’re rude,” but that’s going to be interpreted as an attack on their character. Instead, be specific and constructive: “You interrupted me in that meeting. It made me feel like I wasn’t a valuable part of the team. I’d appreciate it if you let me finish speaking next … [ Read more ]

These Seven Emotions Aren’t Deadly — They’re Your Secret Career Superpowers

Most of us buy into a certain set of myths when it comes to feelings on the job. Even though emotions play a central role in our lives, we’re trained to check them at the door before we head into work. We hesitate before talking openly about the monstrous emotions that lurk beneath the surface at startups. We’re told to “follow your head, not your … [ Read more ]