Sally Helgesen, Marshall Goldsmith

Successful people are often particularly skilled at coming up with reasons for continuing workplace behaviors that in fact no longer serve them. In What Got You Here, Marshall [Goldsmith] showed how their resistance is often rooted in what he calls the success delusion—the belief that because you’ve been successful, not only do you not need to change, you probably should not change. Because if you … [ Read more ]

How Women Rise: Helping Women Change the Behaviors that Get in Their Way

It’s not surprising that many of the behaviors that hold men and women back would be different. After all, women often have very different experiences at work. And experience shapes habits and responses. Familiar habits and responses may feel intrinsic, like part of who you are. But they are not you; they are you on autopilot. Bringing them to conscious awareness is the first step … [ Read more ]

Sally Helgesen, Marshall Goldsmith

Trying to master every detail of your job in order to become an expert is a great strategy for keeping the job you have. But if your goal is to move to a higher level, your expertise is probably not going to get you there. In fact, such mastery often serves to trap you in your current role. […] Of course, we’re not advocating sloppy … [ Read more ]

Sally Helgesen, Marshall Goldsmith

People buy what you’re selling because they like and trust you, and because they believe that what you offer may have value for them. Why do they believe this? Because you so obviously do. Mesmerizing belief in the product is the secret of every great salesperson.

How Women Can Succeed by Rethinking Old Habits

Everyone has self-limiting behaviors; this is simply part of being human. But our combined six decades of professional experience coaching and working with women in virtually every sector have taught us that even women at the highest levels can undermine themselves with specific self-sabotaging behaviors that are different from those that most frequently undermine men.

Expertise, connections, and personal authority are all non-positional kinds of power … [ Read more ]

Marshall Goldsmith

The best leaders focus on making a positive difference and selling their ideas to decision makers, not on proving how smart or how right they are.

Marshall Goldsmith

Behavioral coaching only helps if a person has behavioral issues! […] behavioral coaching doesn’t help if the person or the company is going in the wrong direction. If somebody is going in the wrong direction, behavioral coaching just helps them get there faster. It doesn’t turn the wrong direction into the right direction.

Marshall Goldsmith

Never coach integrity violations. […] People that have integrity violations should be fired, not coached. How many integrity violations does it take to ruin the reputation of your company? Just one. You don’t coach integrity violations. You fire them.

How to Get Incredibly Helpful Feedback from Just About Anyone!

Feedback is very useful for telling us “where we are.” In my experience, there are a hundred wrong ways to ask for feedback and one right way. Most of us know the wrong ways. We ask people, “What do you think of me?” “How do you feel about me?” “What do you hate about me?” or “What do you like about me?” Think about your … [ Read more ]

Disastrous at Delegating? 4 Tips to Become a Pro!

Leaders often fall into the trap that they “need to delegate” more. For some reason, they’ve been led to believe that delegation is always a good thing. It’s not!

If you delegate to someone who isn’t ready for the task or to someone who doesn’t want the responsibility, you will have a disaster on your hands.

So, how can you do a better job of delegating?

Marshall Goldsmith, Kelly Goldsmith

Despite the massive spending on training, companies may end up doing things that stifle rather than promote engagement. It starts with how companies ask questions about employee engagement. The standard practice in almost all organizational survey son the subject is to rely on what Kelly calls passive questions—questions that describe a static condition. “Do you have clear goals?” is an example of a passive question. … [ Read more ]

20 Behaviors Even the Most Successful People Need to Stop

Everyone I have met has exhibited one or more of these 20 bad behavioral habits. Review the list. Do you identify with any of these bad habits? If you are like the majority of people, the answer is yes, and you are ready to start using “What to Stop.”

Happy, Grumpy, Dopey, Sneezy: Which Dwarf Are You?

How does an adult achieve a high level of contentment while living a frenetic and distraction-packed life? It’s not easy. You first have to figure out how you’re spending your time personally and professionally. I measure this in two dimensions: short-term satisfaction and long-term benefit.

The Secret to Becoming the Person You Want to Be

Marshall Goldsmith uses “The Wheel of Change” to help clients decide what to change and where to put their efforts. It illustrates the interchange of two dimensions that we need to sort out before we can become the person we want to be.

The One Question You Need to Ask Yourself before You Say Anything

Which conflicts are useful and which are counter-productive? My experience with great leaders has led me to develop a simple formulation, one that can help you avoid pointless skirmishes and help you take on the challenges that really matter. Follow it, and you will dramatically shrink your daily volume of stress, unpleasant debate and wasted time.

The Success Delusion

Any human, in fact, any animal will tend to repeat behavior that is followed by positive reinforcement. The more successful we become, the more positive reinforcement we get – and the more likely we are to experience the success delusion.

I behave this way. I am successful. Therefore, I must be successful because I behave this way.

Wrong!

Effectively Influencing Decision Makers: Ensuring That Your Knowledge Makes a Difference

The 11 guidelines listed below are intended to help you do a better job of influencing decision-makers. In some cases, these decision-makers may be immediate or upper managers—in other cases they may be peers or cross-organizational colleagues. I hope you find these suggestions to be useful in helping you convert your good ideas into meaningful action.

Leadership Is a Contact Sport

Developing as a leader is a difficult endeavor. It’s not easy, but I’ve developed a leadership development model that has now proven to work with thousands and thousands of people. This model is just eight steps: Ask, Listen, Think, Thank, Respond, Involve, Change, Follow Up.

Adding Too Much Value

A classic problem of smart, successful people is Adding Too Much Value. This bad habit can be defined as the overwhelming desire to add our two cents to every discussion. Adding Too Much Value is common among leaders who are used to running the show. It is extremely difficult for successful people to listen to other people tell them something that they already know without … [ Read more ]

Marshall Goldsmith

Superstition is merely the confusion of correlation and causality. Any human (in fact, any animal) tends to repeat behavior that is followed by positive reinforcement. The more we achieve, the more reinforcement we get. One of the greatest mistakes of successful leaders is the assumption, “I behave this way, and I achieve results. Therefore, I must achieve results because I behave this way. […] One … [ Read more ]