Bharat Kapoor, Scott Tsangeos

By gauging consumer sentiment, you’re not guessing what consumers want and tweaking prototypes. Rather, you’re either validating or disproving your assumptions with data that’s already in the marketplace. Compared with surveys, focus groups, and other traditional methods of obtaining customer feedback, sentiment analysis generates better insights faster, allowing you to incorporate those insights into product design more quickly. By shortening the product development cycle, you … [ Read more ]

Nikhyl Singhal

Here’s my simple definition of product/market fit: The value of each user is greater than the cost of bringing them into the product. It means there are enough customers out there and you can efficiently bring them in. […] There are a lot of product/market fit definitions out there that focus on how many users love you. But that misses a key ingredient: the profitability … [ Read more ]

Jiaona “JZ” Zhang

Your alpha group is the one that already loves you, that would even love your MVP. It’s your mom who will love anything you make. On the other end of the spectrum, your GA is far more skeptical. Your GA is much harder to please. Their trust is hard to earn and even harder to regain once lost. Your beta is your sweet spot for … [ Read more ]

Jiaona “JZ” Zhang

Say you’re trying to test whether people like pizza. If you serve them burnt pizza, you’re not getting feedback on whether they like pizza. You only know that they don’t like burnt pizza. Similarly, when you’re only relying on the MVP [minimum viable product], the fastest and cheapest functional prototype, you risk not actually testing your product, but rather a poor or flawed version of … [ Read more ]

Thales S. Teixeira, Renato Mendes

Any business can — and should — classify their customers’ value chain into value-creating, value-charging (monetizing) and value-eroding activities.

Bailey Richardson

One of the dangers leaders can fall into when they’re growing a vibrant community is listening to that loud 1%. It’s the tail wagging the dog. You have to learn to take in all the feedback that you get, but parse it carefully when it comes to the product decisions that you make that affect a larger audience. Communities are great for supercharging and scaling … [ Read more ]

Bailey Richardson

The missing ingredient in many would-be communities is dedication. We put on one-off events or annual fundraisers, but we don’t give potential community members the chance to keep showing up or to raise their hands to take on responsibilities.

Bailey Richardson

Communities are sacred. They imply a level of connection, advocacy and energy on the part of the people who are showing up. You’re incredibly lucky if you have a passionate group of people with a sense of ownership. It’s not a word to bandy about lightly. There’s a difference between opting into true engagement and passive, utilitarian use or inclusion. Aspiring community builders in the … [ Read more ]

Rahul Vohra

[Sean] Ellis [has] found a leading [product/market fit] indicator: just ask users “how would you feel if you could no longer use the product?” and measure the percent who answer “very disappointed.” After benchmarking nearly a hundred startups with his customer development survey, Ellis found that the magic number was 40%. Companies that struggled to find growth almost always had less than 40% of users … [ Read more ]

Rahul Vohra

To increase your product/market fit […] spend half your time doubling down on what users already love and the other half on addressing what’s holding others back.

Scott Belsky

Your challenge is to create product experiences for two different mindsets, one for your potential customers and one for your engaged customers. Initially, if you want your prospective customers to engage, think of them as lazy, vain, and selfish. Then for the customers who survive the first 30 seconds and actually come through the door, build a meaningful experience and relationship that lasts a lifetime. … [ Read more ]

Scott Belsky

Whether you’re building a product, creating art, or writing a book, you need to remember that your customers or patrons make sweeping judgments in their first experience interacting with your creation – especially in the first thirty seconds. I call this the “first mile,” and it is the most critical yet underserved part of a product. […] In a world of moving fast and pushing … [ Read more ]

Elad Gil

A lot of founders will go to customers and say “Hey, would you want to use this?” And customers will say “That’s great, we’d love to use it.” And so the founders go off and build it, but when then they come back with a product, no one’s using it. That’s because what they should have asked is, “Would you pay for this?” Being interested … [ Read more ]

Payal Kadakia

There’s a behavioral design professor at Stanford, BJ Fogg, who has developed a model that says for any behavior in the world to occur, you need three things to happen at the same time: motivation, ability and a trigger. Motivation can play off of many things, like pleasure or pain, hope or fear. Ability refers to how easy it is to execute the behavior. And … [ Read more ]

Juan Luis Suárez

Consumers have two dimensions. On the one hand, there is the individual that produces and consumes information, and on the other, there is the community member who shares information and whose behavior responds to a flock dynamic. Organize your business processes simultaneously for these two levels of granularity — individuals and groups/communities whose interactions bring about changes in behavior.

Robert Spector, breAnne O. Reeves

When it comes to the song of customer service, everyone knows the words, but few can carry the tune.

Shelly Palmer

There’s a very strong confirmation bias for all content today, regardless of whether it’s entertainment, news, or just information. It will grow even stronger as technology improves. As content distributors, we are fighting the hardest fight ever: getting through the personal filters of people who have opted into their own world view. Many have no interest in getting out of it. […] The free and … [ Read more ]

Erin Reilly

We all start out as audience members. But sometimes, when the combination of factors aligns in just the right way, we become engaged as fans. For businesses, the key to building this engagement and solidifying the relationship is understanding the different types of fan motivations in different contexts, and learning how to turn the data gathered about them into actionable insights. […] Although traditional demographics … [ Read more ]

Namit Kapoor, Lavanya Manohar

Sales leaders need to consider two critical but often overlooked factors when assessing their current and future customers: need and behavior. When combined with value, these indicators will reveal the customers whose strategic direction and operating model come together in a way that could make them huge sources of revenue. Sales teams should then tailor their deployment strategies toward these customers.

Victoria Bough, Ralph Breuer, Harald Fanderl, Kevin Neher

The heart of effective customer-experience measurement is the organizing principle of measuring experience at the journey level, as opposed to looking only at transactional touchpoints or overall satisfaction. […] A more holistic measurement strategy starts with an integrated measurement model in which all customer-experience metrics along touchpoints and journeys flow up to a top-line metric (Exhibit 1). It matters less which top-line metric a business … [ Read more ]